Back-to-School: It’s Time to Think About Health & Accademics

 Trinity Hospital Twin City brings Newsymom readers information about how school can play a critical role in a child’s health.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the academic success of America’s youth is strongly linked with their overall health and is one way to predict adult health outcomes. Experts explain that new data suggests students with higher grade are less likely than their peers with lower grades to participate in certain risk behaviors. These behaviors may be related to substance use, violence or sex.

“Addressing risk behaviors in school settings provides an opportunity for improving student health and supporting overarching school goals regarding academic outcomes,” officials explained.

The CDC indicates that schools have a responsibility and play a critical role in promoting the health and safety of young people. “Standards-based, school health education should focus on both knowledge and skills development in a variety of topics and should be supported by ongoing teacher training,” added officials.

The recent report also suggested that schools can guide teens how to make their way through the health care system by introducing them to clinical settings and working to make clinical care more available through school-based healthcare or referrals to community healthcare settings.

Additionally, in the report experts also note schools can create safe and supportive environments that “ensure safe physical environments and help students stay connected to the school through programs that emphasize inclusiveness.”

The following are snapshots of need-to-know facts published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE AND RISK BEHAVIOR

  • New data released by the CDC confirms that regardless of sex, race/ethnicity and grade-level, high school students reporting lower academic marks also reported greater health risk behaviors.
  • Data showed that high school students who reported getting grades of mostly Ds and Fs were nine times more likely than students who received mostly As to have ever injected any illegal drugs.
  • High school students who reported getting grades of mostly Ds and Fs were five times more likely than students who received mostly As to report that they did not go to school because they felt unsafe.
  • And high school students who reported getting grades of mostly Ds and Fs were four times more likely than students who received mostly As to have had four or more sexual partners.
  • On the other hand, students who reported getting most As were more likely than students getting Ds and Fs to report eating fruits, vegetables and breakfast every day, as well as engage in regular physical activity.

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From this data, CDC officials recommend that in order to promote academic success among youth, schools, parents, and communities can work together to prioritize the health of young people.

HEALTHY STUDENTS DO BETTER IN SCHOOL

  • The CDC notes that students that are physically active, eat breakfast and healthy foods and manage their chronic health conditions (like asthma or diabetes) have increased test scores, better grades, increased school attendance, and improved classroom behavior.

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Additional resources, guides, and recommendations from the CDC on a variety of topics including suicide prevention, school-based programs and more can be found by visiting the CDC online.

Healthy Tip Tuesday is a Newsymom.com exclusive informational series brought to you by Trinity Hospital Twin City.
 

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