Healthy Tip Tuesday: Healthy sleep habits for middle & high school students

(Dennison, Ohio ) – Children and adolescents who do not get enough sleep have a higher risk for many health and behavior problems.

In this week’s Healthy Tip Tuesday, Trinity Hosptial Twin City is bringing families information from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to offer information on how much sleep students need and how many are not getting it.

Importance of Sleep

Children and adolescents who do not get enough sleep have a higher risk of obesity, diabetes, injuries, poor mental health, and problems with attention and behavior.1-4

How much sleep someone needs depends on their age. The American Academy of Sleep Medicine has recommended that children aged 6–12 years should regularly sleep 9–12 hours per 24 hours and teenagers aged 13–18 years should sleep 8–10 hours per 24 hours.

Are Students Getting Enough Sleep?

CDC analyzed data from the 2015 national and state Youth Risk Behavior Surveys.Students were asked how much sleep they usually got on school nights. Students who were 6 to 12 years old and who reported sleeping less than 9 hours were considered to not get enough sleep. Teenagers aged 13 to 18 years who reported sleeping less than 8 hours also were considered to not get enough sleep.

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Middle school students (grades 6-8)

  • Students in 9 states were included in the study
  • About 6 out of 10 (57.8%) did not get enough sleep on school nights

High school students (grades 9-12)

  • National sample
  • About 7 out of 10 (72.7%) did not get enough sleep on school nights

Help Your Child Get the Sleep They Need

Parents can support good sleep habits such as:

  • Sticking to a consistent sleep schedule during the school week and weekends. This means going to bed at the same time each night and getting up at the same time each morning. Adolescents whose parents set bedtimes are more likely to get enough sleep.6 To help decide on a good bedtime for your child, go to the Bedtime Calculator.External
  • Limiting light exposure and technology use in the evenings.
    • Parents can limit when their children may use electronic devices (sometimes referred to as a “media curfew”).
    • Parents can limit where their children may use electronic devices (for example, not in their child’s bedroom).
  • Other tips for better sleep are available at CDC’s Tips for Better Sleep.

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