Akron Children’s Hospital’s Tic and Tourette Service gets national honor

(Akron, Ohio) – Akron Children’s Hospital’s NeuroDevelopmental Science Center’s services for patients with tic and Tourette disorders has been added to a list of national programs that stand out for its excellent care.

The hospital has been designated as one of the Tourette Association of America’s (TAA) Centers of Excellence. Akron Children’s joins a select group of adult and pediatric health care organizations on the list.

The TAA’s Center of Excellence program aims to improve the quality of life of people with Tourette Syndrome and other tic disorders by promoting the highest level of care, research, education and training, and advocacy and awareness for these conditions. The program, which was developed in collaboration with leading medical and scientific experts in Tourette and related conditions, was launched in 2014 with the initial designation of nine centers located at premier medical and academic institutions across the United States.

Akron Children’s pediatric psychologist Katrina Lindsay, who has provided the Comprehensive Behavioral Interventions for Tics (CBIT) program at Akron Children’s for three years, said the hospital applied for the recognition. Patient families, neurologists, fellows and trainees submitted information as part of the extensive application process. About 300 Northeast Ohio children have been able to improve their quality of life through the CBIT program since its inception.

“This designation is proof of the awesome work we do and our commitment to the community,” Lindsay said. “This is where we stand out, and our success speaks significantly to the families and their commitment to treatment even after child has finished with CBIT.”

As part of the honor, Amanda Talty, president of TAA, and Tracey Alexander, vice president, visited Akron and attended Tic Night Out, a social gathering for patients in the CBIT program. It was held Aug. 4 at Scene 75 in Brunswick.

“The Center of Excellence program recognizes medical institutions that offer the highest level of care, are undertaking groundbreaking research, are leaders in training and education and/or provide exceptional community outreach and advocacy for Tourette Syndrome (TS) and tic disorders,” said Talty. “We are thrilled to identify Akron Children’s Hospital as one of the leading providers in Ohio for the TS community. Individuals impacted by this very complex and varied condition often struggle to find proper care and designations, such as these, will ensure that there will be a more uniform, patient-centered approach.”

In other news, two of Lindsey’s patients who have completed CBIT were selected to take part in training as part of the TAA Youth Ambassador Program. Allen Shoaff, of East Canton, and Katie Coburn, of Copley, went to Orlando, Florida, in July for training that prepared them to raise awareness about Tourette Syndrome. They were among 20 youths selected nationwide for the program.

The program brings together, trains and supports teens to advocate for and talk about Tourette and tic disorders in their community, with their elected officials and before their peers at school, sports leagues, scout troops, camps and after-school programs.

Tourette Syndrome (TS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder that becomes evident in early childhood or adolescence. It is part of the spectrum of tic disorders and is characterized by motor and vocal tics. While there is no cure, patients can find success in controlling or minimizing their tics with interventions such as those in CBIT.

For more information on Akron Children’s Tic and Tourette Service, call 330-543-8050 or go to https://www.akronchildrens.org/departments/Tic-and-Tourette-Service.html.

 

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