new baby

Our Baby’s Here! (GULP!) Now What??

There is no manual with step-by-step instructions on how to raise a human, but we’re sharing some key ways to keep you and baby safe.

This informational campaign comes to you in partnership with the Stark County Community Action Agency.

Becoming a parent and bringing a new baby home is overwhelming, even for seasoned moms and dads. Knowing what to research and where to look is helpful when you’re in the trenches of motherhood. If you can spend some time reading about these things before baby arrives, that’s even better!

New Baby Cheat Sheet

Breastfeeding is a great way to feed your child. Understanding the importance of proper breastmilk storage and equipment hygiene is key to keeping your little one healthy and your supply safe. Look into pumping, traveling, and troubling shooting as it pertains to breastfeeding, too.

Postpartum Depression is unpredictable and affects nearly 10 percent of women. If you believe you are experiencing symptoms of PPD seek the advice of a medical professional immediately.

Jaundice is sometimes detected after birth or during the first few weeks of life in some infants. Your doctor might advise a bilirubin test to check for jaundice. If you suspect your baby has jaundice, make an appointment with your pediatrician right away.

Vaccines and an immunization schedule are crucial for your baby’s health and wellness. Your vaccines during pregnancy will protect your infant for a short time but talking with your doctor and keeping your baby on an advised immunization schedule is important.

A newborn screening will be given to your child in the hospital within 48 hours of their birth. This screening tests for diseases and illnesses in the blood. It can also include a hearing test.

The SCCAA Community Actions Pathway HUB is an available resource for pregnant and new mothers in need of support, education, and community services. For more information on breastfeeding, vaccines, and other baby information & safety measures, visit https://www.cdc.gov/pregnancy/after.html.

Audrey Mattevi
Reporting

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